ux

Doorbells, danger and dead batteries: User Research War Stories by Steve Portigal

If (like myself) you have spent years doing user research, you will know really well that there is a huge range of experiences and challenges that you will encounter during this journey. Speaking for myself, I can definitely agree that real-life user research involves both highs and lows, successes and failures.

If you are an academic researcher (again like myself) then you will probably fall under the ‘control freak’ category when it comes to user experience research- as we tend to ‘overthink’ our studies. This is purely because we rely on scripts, checklists and controlled schedules to ensure our studies are scientifically rigorous and will allow us to collect unbiased, measurable and comparable data.

What we tend to underestimate however is the unexpected.

This book is a collection of tales from many UX researchers around the world, offering a mix of interesting anecdotes and practical insights. The stories reveal a wide range of challenges and unexpected situations human centered design researchers find themselves in.

The power of this book lies in its storytelling format, making the stories the researchers have shared more alive and relatable. This is a very enlightening book for people who do user research as it is a good reminder of what real, quality user research entails: skills and enormous empathy.

To purchase the book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Doorbells-Danger-Dead-Batteries-Research/dp/1933820349

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